ABC’s new 2010-11 lineup

ABC announced its new 2010-11 lineup in front of advertisers during its upfront presentation today, and unveiled several new programs.

While Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays remain pat, Tuesday gets a significant face-lift with two new dramas surrounding the Dancing With The Stars results show: No Ordinary Family and Detroit 1-8-7, while Better Together joins ABC’s Wednesday sitcom block, with new drama The Whole Truth to cap off the evening. My Generation replaces FlashForward on Thursday and former Fox reality series Secret Millionaire takes up residence on Friday, leading into Dana Delaney’s new drama Body of Proof.

As alluded to last week, ABC cut four shows to make room for the new fall entries.

Midseason programs include Matthew Perry comedy Mr. Sunshine, and the return of V.

To see ABC’s new schedule and the rest of the midseason entries, click here.

Thought:
Okay, just what the hell is this? My goodness, I thought NBC’s lineup from last fall was bad. But ABC’s is even worse. Detroit 1-8-7 has the potential to be a good show, what will the image-conscious city’s residents think? I like the idea of The Middle moving to the first half-hour of prime-time to make room for Better Together, but why are you keeping ratings loser Cougar Town? My Generation does fit better with the female-skewing Grey’s Anatomy and Private Practice than FlashForward did, but competing against a rejuvenated Survivor will be no easy feat. And why is ABC picking up a jilted Fox show from two years ago in Secret Millionaire? That has to be a first. And tell yours truly why ABC decided to keep Extreme Makeover: Home Edition in its current Sunday night time slot… The Simpsons aren’t that dominant. And V does not deserve to come back at all.

And for all of this buzz about Mr. Sunshine with Matthew Perry – you shelve it until midseason? Why?

ABC’s 2010 fall lineup leaves yours truly rather unimpressed.

Did you know? Believe it or not, Mr. Sunshine has been on ABC’s prime-time sked before – in the spring of 1986, it was a short-lived sitcom featuring Arrested Development’s Jeffrey Tambor as a blind university professor, which drew criticism from interest groups for the show poking fun at his disability. The program replaced the canceled Diff’rent Strokes in the Friday night 8 p.m. (CT) time slot and perished instantly opposite Dallas.

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